MOSEIA Executive Director Position

Job Posting: MOSEIA Executive Director

MOSEIA, the Missouri Solar Energy Industries Association, was created in 2009 to represent and expand Missouri’s solar industry. MOSEIA is an official state chapter of the national Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). The organization is committed to rapid solar industry growth growing the solar industry through outreach, advocacy and continuing education. Join an exciting, growing industry that you can feel good about. Investing in solar helps customers save money, become more energy independent, contribute to cleaner air, all while creating green jobs and boosting the local economy. In addition, solar is one of the fastest growing sectors of the American economy. There are currently more than 174,000 solar workers in the U.S., a 20% increase over employment totals in 2013. Missouri boasts approximately 100 solar companies employing more than 2,000 people.

Position: Executive Director
Based in MidMissouri
(Columbia/Jefferson City region), the Executive Director (ED) of MOSEIA is the face of the Missouri solar industry. The ED has the principal role of ensuring the sustainability of the organization by fundraising from members and sponsors, interacting with the board of directors and member companies, facilitating educational opportunities for member
companies, and helping coordinate policy issues at the statehouse and utility regulatory
commission.

Key Activities and Duties :
● Handle the financials of the organization, including budgeting, invoicing, tax
management and fundraising
● Track legislation at the Missouri General Assembly, prepare reports, testify before
legislative committees and possibly lobbying
● Track solar and renewable dockets at the Missouri Public Service Commission
● Prepare updates for the board and general membership
● Plan and execute a yearly industry conference facilitate sponsorships, obtain speakers
● Coordinate volunteers
● Manage communications for the organization, including media relations, website
management and stakeholder emails/newsletters/blogs

Qualifications and Requirements:
● Four year degree
● Access to reliable transportation to state government and other facilities in Jefferson City and occasionally throughout the state
● Proficient with Microsoft and Google Applications, in addition to DropBox,
UberConference and similar technologies
● Excellent written and verbal communication skills, including the ability to present before
an audience
● Ability to establish and manage priorities without direct supervision
● Understanding of the solar industry and basic understanding of solar technology
● Understanding of the legislative and regulatory process in Missouri
● Five years of applicable work experience strongly preferred
● Prior experience with renewables, the legislature or public service commission, and
fundraising strongly preferred
How to Apply:
Email a cover letter, resume, and one writing sample by June 6, 2016 to
carthur@ussunsolar.com and erin@straightupsolar.com.

Energy Specialist Job Posting

Job Title:              Energy Specialist               

Department:      Energy Services & Solutions           

Specialty:            Solar 

Reports To:          Energy Services & Solutions Manager 

Location:              Cottage Grove, MN 

FLSA Status:        Exempt                

Revision Date:    February 2014 

Summary:
The Energy Specialist plays a crucial role in achieving our purpose of being our customers’ competitive advantage by providing technical expertise that will aid in developing, maintaining, and delivering technical training to customers and vendors. This role will be responsible for the building and maintain relationships with Solar PV and other Energy customers and vendors in collaboration with the Account Managers, Sales Engineers, and fellow Energy specialists.  On a day-to-day basis this position will work closely with Account Managers, Sales Engineers, and Energy Team to provide high level technical support and ongoing training to customers. Click to Learn more

Missouri lawmakers may be warming up to solar power

Measures aimed at fostering more solar energy have been filed in the Missouri General Assembly and, according to one legislator, are likely to generate more enthusiasm than the chilly reception they got last year.

One bill could substantially increase the number of renewable generators that could qualify for net metering by hiking the size cap from the current 100 kilowatts to one megawatt.

Supreme Court Ruling Brightens Southwest Missouri’s Solar Forecast

SAINT LOUIS, MO., FEB 11, 2015 – A Missouri Supreme Court opinion yesterday stated that The Legislature May Not Repeal an Initiative in Whole or in Part in Advance of its Passage.  Using strong language, the opinion called out the constitutionally protected right of the people of Missouri to enact legislation by ballot initiative.  The case focused on Empire Electric, an investor owned utility in Southwest Missouri, which promoted legislation passed by the legislature in 2008 attempting to exempt Empire from being required to participate in a rebate program that was included in the ballot language of Proposition C.
READ MORE

MOSEIA Press Release – Feb 11, 2015

Supreme Court Opinion

On roofs around the city, solar energy raises its profile

Nick Fandos – St. Louis Beacon

Driving past Civil Life Brewing Co. on a sunny afternoon, the flash of reflected sunlight can be distracting. A glance back at the year-old brewery in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis reveals the light’s source: an array of 106 solar panels blanketing the brewery’s south-facing roof, shining in the sunlight.

“As a brewery, I think it’s important to be conscious of your environmental impact,” said Civil Life owner Jake Hafner. “For us, it was also just about good business strategy.”

With 25 kilowatts worth of panels and high-grade insulation, Hafner said he is saving hundreds of dollars a month in energy costs by reducing what he pulls from the traditional power grid by 35-50 percent. He monitors his solar production online and earns credit with Ameren, the brewery’s electric utility, when he produces more than he needs.

Link to read entire article online.

Energy Subsidies: Plan A: Level the Playing Field by Ending Misconceptions

by Dane Glueck – MOSEIA President

Many times when talking policy the concept that renewables / solar should “stand on their own” without subsidies shows up in the conversation.   This perceived need for solar to “stand on its own” is a significant misperception due to the mistaken thought that renewables / solar have an even playing field. Remarkably, it’s even more uneven than the numbers show because much of the fossil fuel subsidies are written into the tax code as opposed to renewable subsidies that are time limited. It’s time to break down this misconception and replace it with the current energy reality.

Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

If you are ready for the facts about energy subsidies: click here to see a quick 3 slide summary.

Solar: The “Fastest Growing Industry in America”

– Introduction – Stephen Lacey – Solar Feeds; article Andrew Berger – Clean Technica

The U.S. solar industry grew 102% last year and is on track to grow another 100% this year. What other industry doubled its growth during one of the worst economic periods in our history?

The GOP has been using the Solyndra debacle to talk about “pet alternative energy.” This nonsense ignores the incredible growth and cost reductions taking place in the solar industry. Since 2008, average PV prices have fallen 80%. And with innovative approaches to installation, the total installed cost of installations have fallen substantially as well.

A recent report found that America actually had a $1.9 billion trade surplus of solar products to the rest of the world in 2010. And that same report, put together by GTM Research, found that 73% of the economic value of a solar installation stays in the U.S.  Rather than let the conversation be hijacked by the pro-pollution gang, we need to use the Solyndra story to continue talking about the domestic value of solar.

LINK HERE TO ENTIRE ARTICLE